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Jedaia
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Red Rising (Red Rising Trilogy #1) by Pierce Brown My rating: ★★★★★Date Read: June 19, 2014 Red Rising  was an intense, unexpectedly thought-provoking, and well-crafted read. I went into this book blind as I didn’t read any review prior to reading it. It’s above and beyond the books that it’s being compared to. It’s in a whole different level with its showcase of memorable characters and cunning scenes.Set on Mars, Red Rising introduces Darrow who is on a quest of fulfilling a loved one’s dream as he joins the rebellion against the oligarchy composed of Golds – the highest color in a world where your Color decides your standing in the society. As a Red, he toils below the surface and digs to ready the surface for human occupation. Little did he and his fellow lowReds know that they’ve been deceived all their lives.Darrow is a strong character. He starts off as the loving husband who wants to win a Laurel so he could provide luxury to his wife and their people. At sixteen, he’s rash but his desires – to eat, to dance and sing the songs of his people – are simple. Then grief turns him hopeless and there comes the moment for change and drastic actions. He goes through death-defying surgeries and operations to turn him into a Gold and allow him to beat the unjust system that’s guiding their world. Aside from Darrow, the reader will meet an array of characters that are reflections of the different faces human beings could don on when vying for power and racing for survival. The characters have distinct personalities that you will love and hate, pity and empathize with, worship and abhor. This book is teeming with narcissists, psychopaths, vengeful children, government members who consider death as a source of amusement, rebels that would do anything to rise up against the slavery and insubordination, and motivated individuals who forsake morality for the fruition of their goals. The writing is witty and intelligent. Everything is well thought-out. There are sharp bursts of humor that would make you smile despite the horror and the violence that you’re reading. Surprises are well-delivered and there is a lack of dramatic irony. You wouldn’t know what was happening until Darrow tells you what’s what. The book is not for everyone. It’s complex, harsh, and merciless as deaths (in various forms) meet you unexpectedly in the corners of this book. There are a lot of violent lessons to learn through brutal ways and Red Rising questions you as to the extents to which you’ll go in achieving your goals. Does the murder of a violator provide justice? What does it take to become a good leader? Will survival justify crumbling down alliances and friendships?
—View all my reviews

Red Rising (Red Rising Trilogy #1) by Pierce Brown
My rating: ★★★★★
Date Read: June 19, 2014

Red Rising was an intense, unexpectedly thought-provoking, and well-crafted read. I went into this book blind as I didn’t read any review prior to reading it. It’s above and beyond the books that it’s being compared to. It’s in a whole different level with its showcase of memorable characters and cunning scenes.

Set on Mars, Red Rising introduces Darrow who is on a quest of fulfilling a loved one’s dream as he joins the rebellion against the oligarchy composed of Golds – the highest color in a world where your Color decides your standing in the society. As a Red, he toils below the surface and digs to ready the surface for human occupation. Little did he and his fellow lowReds know that they’ve been deceived all their lives.

Darrow is a strong character. He starts off as the loving husband who wants to win a Laurel so he could provide luxury to his wife and their people. At sixteen, he’s rash but his desires – to eat, to dance and sing the songs of his people – are simple. Then grief turns him hopeless and there comes the moment for change and drastic actions. He goes through death-defying surgeries and operations to turn him into a Gold and allow him to beat the unjust system that’s guiding their world.

Aside from Darrow, the reader will meet an array of characters that are reflections of the different faces human beings could don on when vying for power and racing for survival. The characters have distinct personalities that you will love and hate, pity and empathize with, worship and abhor. This book is teeming with narcissists, psychopaths, vengeful children, government members who consider death as a source of amusement, rebels that would do anything to rise up against the slavery and insubordination, and motivated individuals who forsake morality for the fruition of their goals.

The writing is witty and intelligent. Everything is well thought-out. There are sharp bursts of humor that would make you smile despite the horror and the violence that you’re reading. Surprises are well-delivered and there is a lack of dramatic irony. You wouldn’t know what was happening until Darrow tells you what’s what.

The book is not for everyone. It’s complex, harsh, and merciless as deaths (in various forms) meet you unexpectedly in the corners of this book. There are a lot of violent lessons to learn through brutal ways and Red Rising questions you as to the extents to which you’ll go in achieving your goals. Does the murder of a violator provide justice? What does it take to become a good leader? Will survival justify crumbling down alliances and friendships?



View all my reviews



Posted 2 months ago reblog 12 notes


The Winner’s Curse (The Winner’s Trilogy) by Marie Rutkoski My rating: ★★★Date Read: June 18, 2014
The Winner’s Curse tells the story of Kestrel, the daughter of a Trajan general of the Valorian empire — an empire known for wars and slavery and who has recently conquered the Herrani empire and made slaves out of the survivors. Kestrel purchases a Herrani slave at an auction and takes him into her estate. Little did she know that Arin, the defiant, blacksmith slave, has plans beyond serving his new mistress.
At first, I was intrigued by the promise held by The Winner’s Curse and I wanted to find out if it could live up to the hype that it has been generating. Unfortunately, I didn’t like it as much as I expected.The book is told in Kestrel’s perspective but now and then, Arin gets the chance to tell the story. I liked how it wasn’t an alternating POV and instead ended up teasing the reader of Arin’s thoughts, feelings, and motives from time to time.Kestrel’s father had been urging her to enlist to the military because he values her strength as a strategist. However, Kestrel isn’t competent when it comes to physical combat and she dreads the idea of killing a person. Her only option, then, would be to get married but she wanted to have a choice beyond those two. Kestrel is an effective character at first. I admired how she calls on other people’s bullshit, how she doesn’t back down from other people’s threats, and how much she wanted to be independent and get away from the social conventions and traditions. She’s smart. She’s impulsive. On the other hand, Arin doesn’t act like a normal slave. He carries himself with an ease and confidence not usually seen on those oppressed.Both main characters are strong. But sadly, I felt like they weren’t developed enough. Sometimes, their reactions and actions felt off. The character development was all over the place. Their behavior and thoughts sometimes didn’t stay true to what they were individually. The same goes for the other characters. Some of them were interesting and some of them were perplexing because of contradictions in actions — something which I expected there was an explanation to but Rutkoski didn’t provide one.Moreover, the book lacks an in-depth treatment when it comes to storytelling. As a reader, I would like to see details that would both steer my imagination into the correct path and fuel it. There wasn’t enough background to as to what motivated Valoria to expand its territory. Was it simple envy of how Herrani flourished? Was it mere greed? I wanted to see motives, motives that would justify enslaving a whole race of people.Furthermore, it was also clear that Rutkoski isn’t as capable as writer as others when it comes to battle scenes. She just ended up feeding all these information about how an attack would occur and when it came for the battle scenes to finally transpire, I was detached from all that was happening. It’s a shame because the action was an important aspect in the story. There just wasn’t enough tension.At the end of the day, it was actually hard to connect to the scenes and feel emotionally invested to what was happening. Once in a while, I would find my eyes glued hungrily to the pages but the book failed to maintain a rapport with me. It’s a shame but I guess this book was just not for me. I’d like to think that I’d be interested to continue with the series. I just hope that the writing style would improve in a way that would highlight the world-building well and expose and bare the characters properly.—View all my reviews

The Winner’s Curse (The Winner’s Trilogy) by Marie Rutkoski
My rating: ★★★
Date Read: June 18, 2014

The Winner’s Curse tells the story of Kestrel, the daughter of a Trajan general of the Valorian empire — an empire known for wars and slavery and who has recently conquered the Herrani empire and made slaves out of the survivors. Kestrel purchases a Herrani slave at an auction and takes him into her estate. Little did she know that Arin, the defiant, blacksmith slave, has plans beyond serving his new mistress.


At first, I was intrigued by the promise held by The Winner’s Curse and I wanted to find out if it could live up to the hype that it has been generating. Unfortunately, I didn’t like it as much as I expected.

The book is told in Kestrel’s perspective but now and then, Arin gets the chance to tell the story. I liked how it wasn’t an alternating POV and instead ended up teasing the reader of Arin’s thoughts, feelings, and motives from time to time.

Kestrel’s father had been urging her to enlist to the military because he values her strength as a strategist. However, Kestrel isn’t competent when it comes to physical combat and she dreads the idea of killing a person. Her only option, then, would be to get married but she wanted to have a choice beyond those two. Kestrel is an effective character at first. I admired how she calls on other people’s bullshit, how she doesn’t back down from other people’s threats, and how much she wanted to be independent and get away from the social conventions and traditions. She’s smart. She’s impulsive. On the other hand, Arin doesn’t act like a normal slave. He carries himself with an ease and confidence not usually seen on those oppressed.

Both main characters are strong. But sadly, I felt like they weren’t developed enough. Sometimes, their reactions and actions felt off. The character development was all over the place. Their behavior and thoughts sometimes didn’t stay true to what they were individually. The same goes for the other characters. Some of them were interesting and some of them were perplexing because of contradictions in actions — something which I expected there was an explanation to but Rutkoski didn’t provide one.

Moreover, the book lacks an in-depth treatment when it comes to storytelling. As a reader, I would like to see details that would both steer my imagination into the correct path and fuel it. There wasn’t enough background to as to what motivated Valoria to expand its territory. Was it simple envy of how Herrani flourished? Was it mere greed? I wanted to see motives, motives that would justify enslaving a whole race of people.

Furthermore, it was also clear that Rutkoski isn’t as capable as writer as others when it comes to battle scenes. She just ended up feeding all these information about how an attack would occur and when it came for the battle scenes to finally transpire, I was detached from all that was happening. It’s a shame because the action was an important aspect in the story. There just wasn’t enough tension.

At the end of the day, it was actually hard to connect to the scenes and feel emotionally invested to what was happening. Once in a while, I would find my eyes glued hungrily to the pages but the book failed to maintain a rapport with me. It’s a shame but I guess this book was just not for me.

I’d like to think that I’d be interested to continue with the series. I just hope that the writing style would improve in a way that would highlight the world-building well and expose and bare the characters properly.


View all my reviews



Posted 2 months ago reblog 5 notes


Talented (Talented Saga #1) by Sophie Davis My rating: ★★★★Date read: June 30, 2012
Intriguing. Kick-ass. And I'm smitten
I was captivated by the summary and I’m happy to say that I was not let down by Talented. I was even surprised in a very good way as I wasn’t really expecting to be ultimately caught up.
Natalia Lyon’s world was set after the world had gone through extreme environmental changes, after the world was contaminated by nuclear leaks that probably induced powers, abilities, TALENTS on the children born. It wasn’t a totally unique concept but the twists and the plot that Davis came up with was what I truly considered as one of a kind.These Talents - people with the abilities - led the separation of the states into two factions: the Agency and the Coalition.Natalia Lyon’s parents were thought to be killed by Ian Crane, the leader of the Coalition and she was in search of revenge. Thus, she aimed to become a Hunter - the equivalent for spies. As a hunter, she would need to thwart rebellious attempts of those who rejects Talents, kill those who are harming the Talents’ causes.Talia’s life, while training to become a Hunter, was packed with conflicting emotions towards two boys, betrayals, missions, pressures and secrets.
I love Talented. It rocked me and I was holding my breath while I was reading through the final pages. I didn’t want it to end, especially with the kind of heart-pounding ending that Davis wrote.With regards to the writing style, despite some typos, it was good. The pace was enough not to bore me.The characters are strong, interesting and I became quite attached to a few of them.Talia is incredible. Her powers were beyond awesome and it was revealed that she’s capable of more than what she thinks. I badly want to know how truly powerful she really is! In a conflicted world, she grew up to be not normal. She’s motivated by revenge brought about by the death of her parents, surrounded by people who either were uneasy of her or were putting pressures on her. She’s brave and the weakness that she displays from time to time are valid and reasonable. I love how Davis wrote about how Talia is also plagued by normal problems like boys and love life.Speaking of boys, wow. Could this book get any thrilling and hot? I was starting to fall in love with Donavon and ended up choosing Erik because well, why shouldn’t I? Donavon was a disappointment and learning how he kept some vital secrets and is still keeping some from Talia was a let down. Thank God we have Erik. He’s sarcastic, entertaining, funny, and hot. But despite all these, it turned out that he has some deep issues as well.One more thing I love was how this book has more to offer. More secrets are needed to be revealed. More betrayals are about to come to fruition. More frustration in regards with the boys! And yes, I consider the ending as a cliff-hanger. Totally.I also want to thank the author for providing me a copy. This book made my day. I’m glad to have found such an interesting book.

Talented (Talented Saga #1) by Sophie Davis
My rating: ★★★★
Date read: June 30, 2012

Intriguing. Kick-ass. And I'm smitten


I was captivated by the summary and I’m happy to say that I was not let down by Talented. I was even surprised in a very good way as I wasn’t really expecting to be ultimately caught up.

Natalia Lyon’s world was set after the world had gone through extreme environmental changes, after the world was contaminated by nuclear leaks that probably induced powers, abilities, TALENTS on the children born. It wasn’t a totally unique concept but the twists and the plot that Davis came up with was what I truly considered as one of a kind.

These Talents - people with the abilities - led the separation of the states into two factions: the Agency and the Coalition.

Natalia Lyon’s parents were thought to be killed by Ian Crane, the leader of the Coalition and she was in search of revenge. Thus, she aimed to become a Hunter - the equivalent for spies. As a hunter, she would need to thwart rebellious attempts of those who rejects Talents, kill those who are harming the Talents’ causes.

Talia’s life, while training to become a Hunter, was packed with conflicting emotions towards two boys, betrayals, missions, pressures and secrets.

I love Talented. It rocked me and I was holding my breath while I was reading through the final pages. I didn’t want it to end, especially with the kind of heart-pounding ending that Davis wrote.

With regards to the writing style, despite some typos, it was good. The pace was enough not to bore me.

The characters are strong, interesting and I became quite attached to a few of them.

Talia is incredible. Her powers were beyond awesome and it was revealed that she’s capable of more than what she thinks. I badly want to know how truly powerful she really is! In a conflicted world, she grew up to be not normal. She’s motivated by revenge brought about by the death of her parents, surrounded by people who either were uneasy of her or were putting pressures on her. She’s brave and the weakness that she displays from time to time are valid and reasonable. I love how Davis wrote about how Talia is also plagued by normal problems like boys and love life.

Speaking of boys, wow. Could this book get any thrilling and hot? I was starting to fall in love with Donavon and ended up choosing Erik because well, why shouldn’t I? Donavon was a disappointment and learning how he kept some vital secrets and is still keeping some from Talia was a let down. Thank God we have Erik. He’s sarcastic, entertaining, funny, and hot. But despite all these, it turned out that he has some deep issues as well.

One more thing I love was how this book has more to offer. More secrets are needed to be revealed. More betrayals are about to come to fruition. More frustration in regards with the boys! And yes, I consider the ending as a cliff-hanger. Totally.

I also want to thank the author for providing me a copy. This book made my day. I’m glad to have found such an interesting book.



Posted 2 months ago reblog 7 notes


Anew (The Archers of Avalon #1) by Chelsea Fine My rating: ★★★★★Date Read: November, 2012I just accidentally came across this book while I was browsing Goodreads. Upon realizing that the author is Chelsea Fine (who wrote Sophie & Carter), I knew I have to read Anew because I’m sure I’ll be in to a lot of sweetness and spazz-inducing scenes. I was not wrong.
Anew is the story of Scarlet- the girl who found herself in the forest two years ago, not able to remember anything but her name — and of the Archer brothers who turned out to be immortal and were deeply in love with Scarlet even though she didn’t know it at first.Because he couldn’t help himself, Gabriel approached Scarlet during a festival and Scarlet felt like he was so familiar to her. She felt safe and later on found herself getting close to Gabriel only to find out that he was hiding secrets from her namely his brother, Tristan Archer, their immortality and a curse that binds them all.
First of all, the book is told through three POV’s: Scarlet’s, Gabriel’s and Tristan’s. And I found myself enjoying this kind of set-up because we get to be in the heads of the three main characters of the story.Regarding the characters, I love them. And I’m in love with Tristan. Yes, there definitely is a love triangle. As we know, love triangles can get pretty bothersome but in Anew, it’s different. Unlike in other books where two boys desperately insult each other, constantly fight to figure out whose testosterone is much higher, Gabriel and Tristan — as brothers — actually do have fun scenes together. There may be tension from time to time but I liked how they put Scarlet before anything else.To add, I don’t really know who Scarlet will end up with. It’s very rare to find a book wherein it’s difficult to actually know the final team-up and Anew is just that.The major factor that made this story really stand out was how it didn’t give out all the details. Little by little, the readers are given information and answers to all the mysteries but in the end, we are still left to ache for more since questions after questions keep on popping out.Truly, I am left with a lot of questions that I hope will have some answers during the second book. The need to have the mysteries unveiled is such a motivator for readers to actually pick up the sequel.After reading this book, I couldn’t stop myself from always thinking about it. Swear. You’ll be left generating your own answers and whatnot to the whole fountain, curse, Tristan-Scarlet thing. Anew is highly recommended.
—View all my reviews

Anew (The Archers of Avalon #1) by Chelsea Fine
My rating: ★★★★★
Date Read: November, 2012

I just accidentally came across this book while I was browsing Goodreads. Upon realizing that the author is Chelsea Fine (who wrote Sophie & Carter), I knew I have to read Anew because I’m sure I’ll be in to a lot of sweetness and spazz-inducing scenes. I was not wrong.

Anew is the story of Scarlet- the girl who found herself in the forest two years ago, not able to remember anything but her name — and of the Archer brothers who turned out to be immortal and were deeply in love with Scarlet even though she didn’t know it at first.

Because he couldn’t help himself, Gabriel approached Scarlet during a festival and Scarlet felt like he was so familiar to her. She felt safe and later on found herself getting close to Gabriel only to find out that he was hiding secrets from her namely his brother, Tristan Archer, their immortality and a curse that binds them all.

First of all, the book is told through three POV’s: Scarlet’s, Gabriel’s and Tristan’s. And I found myself enjoying this kind of set-up because we get to be in the heads of the three main characters of the story.

Regarding the characters, I love them. And I’m in love with Tristan.
Yes, there definitely is a love triangle. As we know, love triangles can get pretty bothersome but in Anew, it’s different. Unlike in other books where two boys desperately insult each other, constantly fight to figure out whose testosterone is much higher, Gabriel and Tristan — as brothers — actually do have fun scenes together. There may be tension from time to time but I liked how they put Scarlet before anything else.

To add, I don’t really know who Scarlet will end up with. It’s very rare to find a book wherein it’s difficult to actually know the final team-up and Anew is just that.

The major factor that made this story really stand out was how it didn’t give out all the details. Little by little, the readers are given information and answers to all the mysteries but in the end, we are still left to ache for more since questions after questions keep on popping out.

Truly, I am left with a lot of questions that I hope will have some answers during the second book. The need to have the mysteries unveiled is such a motivator for readers to actually pick up the sequel.

After reading this book, I couldn’t stop myself from always thinking about it. Swear. You’ll be left generating your own answers and whatnot to the whole fountain, curse, Tristan-Scarlet thing.

Anew is highly recommended.



View all my reviews



Posted 2 months ago reblog 6 notes


 Frost (The Frost Chronicles, #1)  by  Kate Avery Ellison
My rating: ★★★★
"Is this struggle to feel worth it?”Frost. Oh, what a joy you are. I literally wasn’t able to put this book down. In my attempt to go to sleep, I decided to read this and ended up not sleeping at all until 3 hours later because I had to finish it, I just had to read everything! It absorbed me into the story.

Frost is the world of the cold, where monsters called “Watchers” lurk to hunt the villagers when it’s dark and to also protect them from the “Farthers” — the people living beyond the Frost, residing in Aeralis, whose legends of torture, prisoners and cruelty are told to children as bedtime stories.Lia Weaver, after the death of their parents, was responsible for the safety of her family. But that safety and integrity was put into test when Ivy, her younger sister, found a wounded young man in the woods. Should they save him or leave him in the cold to die, knowing that he’s a Farther, one of those people that their village is warning them about? Lia made a choice. She brought the young man to their barn and later found out that not only is Gabe a fugitive, he’s also on a mission to find a “gate” to transport him to safety.Secrets are then revealed. People are unveiled. An organization called “Thorn” proved to be a vital piece in their lives.

First of all, the writing style was commendable. I like the way the words were so captivating, enthralling and poetic. Ellison weaved the words into scenes that I was compelled not to miss. It was simply beautiful. I loved the dominance of figures of speech in her writing. What the characters felt, I felt. What they thought, I thought about. She has the kind of style that sucks you in.The characters. They’re not superficial. They’re surprising. Lia, conflicted she may be at some point, was really brave to do the things that she did. Being responsible for her orphaned siblings was no easy feat. And to be burdened by secrets that could affect the whole village was another thing to note. I love her words, especially those she’d said to Gabe.Gabe, I believe, is so much more. There are still a lot of things to be discovered about him. He still has secrets to tell. As a character, he’s very interesting because he set the events into motion. Adam Brewer, is the most intriguing character here. I want to know more about him! I think he’ll have a major role in Lia’s life in the future. Yes, I’m pro-Gabe but my mind is also imagining Adam and Lia as a couple. Oh, well. :)I was comfortable with the pace of the story but what dissatisfied me was the length. For heaven’s sake, it was too short! I wanted more. I didn’t want it to end so soon. I think we didn’t get enough of Gabe, of Adam, of the whole Farther debacle, of Lia’s relationship with Gabe, of the words that they told each other. I just wanted more. :<Nonetheless, it was really an awesome read. It reminded me a little of The Maze Runner by James Dashner what with all the mysteries, secrets, and twists of the story. The ending, the people involved in it, was not something I expected but I should have. It just goes to show how well the author fabricated this story because I didn’t really see some of the events coming.I’m grateful, by the way, to the author for providing me a copy and the opportunity of getting to meet with this memorable book. :) Two thumbs-up!

Frost (The Frost Chronicles, #1) by Kate Avery Ellison

My rating: ★★★★

"Is this struggle to feel worth it?”

Frost. Oh, what a joy you are. I literally wasn’t able to put this book down. In my attempt to go to sleep, I decided to read this and ended up not sleeping at all until 3 hours later because I had to finish it, I just had to read everything! It absorbed me into the story.

Frost is the world of the cold, where monsters called “Watchers” lurk to hunt the villagers when it’s dark and to also protect them from the “Farthers” — the people living beyond the Frost, residing in Aeralis, whose legends of torture, prisoners and cruelty are told to children as bedtime stories.

Lia Weaver, after the death of their parents, was responsible for the safety of her family. But that safety and integrity was put into test when Ivy, her younger sister, found a wounded young man in the woods. Should they save him or leave him in the cold to die, knowing that he’s a Farther, one of those people that their village is warning them about? Lia made a choice. She brought the young man to their barn and later found out that not only is Gabe a fugitive, he’s also on a mission to find a “gate” to transport him to safety.

Secrets are then revealed. People are unveiled. An organization called “Thorn” proved to be a vital piece in their lives.

First of all, the writing style was commendable. I like the way the words were so captivating, enthralling and poetic. Ellison weaved the words into scenes that I was compelled not to miss. It was simply beautiful. I loved the dominance of figures of speech in her writing. What the characters felt, I felt. What they thought, I thought about. She has the kind of style that sucks you in.

The characters. They’re not superficial. They’re surprising. Lia, conflicted she may be at some point, was really brave to do the things that she did. Being responsible for her orphaned siblings was no easy feat. And to be burdened by secrets that could affect the whole village was another thing to note. I love her words, especially those she’d said to Gabe.

Gabe, I believe, is so much more. There are still a lot of things to be discovered about him. He still has secrets to tell. As a character, he’s very interesting because he set the events into motion. Adam Brewer, is the most intriguing character here. I want to know more about him! I think he’ll have a major role in Lia’s life in the future. Yes, I’m pro-Gabe but my mind is also imagining Adam and Lia as a couple. Oh, well. :)

I was comfortable with the pace of the story but what dissatisfied me was the length. For heaven’s sake, it was too short! I wanted more. I didn’t want it to end so soon. I think we didn’t get enough of Gabe, of Adam, of the whole Farther debacle, of Lia’s relationship with Gabe, of the words that they told each other. I just wanted more. :<

Nonetheless, it was really an awesome read. It reminded me a little of The Maze Runner by James Dashner what with all the mysteries, secrets, and twists of the story. The ending, the people involved in it, was not something I expected but I should have. It just goes to show how well the author fabricated this story because I didn’t really see some of the events coming.

I’m grateful, by the way, to the author for providing me a copy and the opportunity of getting to meet with this memorable book. :) Two thumbs-up!



Posted 8 months ago reblog 8 notes


Geek Girl by Cindy C. Bennett
My rating: ★★★★★
Sweet. Sappy. Romantic. I know that this is what other reviewers&#8217; start their reviews with but oh, well. I am a huge fan of Heart on a Chain and I&#8217;ve been waiting for a long time to find a copy of Geek Girl because I have high expectations on Ms. Bennett. She didn&#8217;t disappoint. Oh boy, did she deliver.Upon reading the blurb, you&#8217;ll guess that the story can pretty much be predictable and you&#8217;ll know where the plot will end up. But, what matters most in this book is the journey, the scenes, and the emotions that every page entailed. All through out the book, I was hooked and was spazzing with just how cute, sweet, romantic and gushy the characters are and the whole setting they were in.

Because of a dare, Jennifer approached Trevor, one of the school&#8217;s geeks, with the intention of making him a bad boy. But little did she know that being in Trevor&#8217;s company would lead to her own self-transformation and discovery as she ends up blowing off her friends and choosing instead the company of Trevor as they go on bowling nights, spend time on the trampoline and watch tons of sci-fi movies.

Let&#8217;s start with the characters. They&#8217;re all interesting. Unlike with other books wherein we see a bad boy, Geek Girl has a bad girl for a heroine. Jen has been passed from foster family to another family. She has trust and commitment issues, among others. Through out the whole book, we can see a very well-written character development regarding Jen as we see her change from a self-destructive girl to someone who&#8217;s capable of staying and caring for other people.Trevor. Trevor. Now, he&#8217;s the highlight of the whole book. Gah. My feelings. I have so much to say about him and all of them are good. He&#8217;s a nerd. He&#8217;s a geek. He doesn&#8217;t party, he makes straight-As, he tucks his shirt in and he spends night bowling nights with his family. You may never think that you&#8217;ll never possibly fall in love with him but you&#8217;ll end up eating your own words because he&#8217;s totally swoon-worthy. Trevor is unflinchingly honest and he&#8217;s full of love, forgiveness and care that he seems too good to be true. His quirks are very adorable and everything about him just made me smile and spazz.Of course, the book doesn&#8217;t just focus on the relationship of Jen and Trevor. It also discusses about Jen&#8217;s issue on her family and the things she&#8217;s dealing with. The pace is relatively fast but it&#8217;s appropriate and tolerable. Geek Girl is highly recommended for people out there looking for a romantic read.

Geek Girl by Cindy C. Bennett

My rating: ★★★★★

Sweet. Sappy. Romantic.

I know that this is what other reviewers’ start their reviews with but oh, well. I am a huge fan of Heart on a Chain and I’ve been waiting for a long time to find a copy of Geek Girl because I have high expectations on Ms. Bennett. She didn’t disappoint. Oh boy, did she deliver.

Upon reading the blurb, you’ll guess that the story can pretty much be predictable and you’ll know where the plot will end up. But, what matters most in this book is the journey, the scenes, and the emotions that every page entailed. All through out the book, I was hooked and was spazzing with just how cute, sweet, romantic and gushy the characters are and the whole setting they were in.

Because of a dare, Jennifer approached Trevor, one of the school’s geeks, with the intention of making him a bad boy. But little did she know that being in Trevor’s company would lead to her own self-transformation and discovery as she ends up blowing off her friends and choosing instead the company of Trevor as they go on bowling nights, spend time on the trampoline and watch tons of sci-fi movies.

Let’s start with the characters. They’re all interesting. Unlike with other books wherein we see a bad boy, Geek Girl has a bad girl for a heroine. Jen has been passed from foster family to another family. She has trust and commitment issues, among others. Through out the whole book, we can see a very well-written character development regarding Jen as we see her change from a self-destructive girl to someone who’s capable of staying and caring for other people.

Trevor. Trevor. Now, he’s the highlight of the whole book. Gah. My feelings. I have so much to say about him and all of them are good. He’s a nerd. He’s a geek. He doesn’t party, he makes straight-As, he tucks his shirt in and he spends night bowling nights with his family. You may never think that you’ll never possibly fall in love with him but you’ll end up eating your own words because he’s totally swoon-worthy. Trevor is unflinchingly honest and he’s full of love, forgiveness and care that he seems too good to be true. His quirks are very adorable and everything about him just made me smile and spazz.

Of course, the book doesn’t just focus on the relationship of Jen and Trevor. It also discusses about Jen’s issue on her family and the things she’s dealing with.

The pace is relatively fast but it’s appropriate and tolerable. Geek Girl is highly recommended for people out there looking for a romantic read.



Posted 8 months ago reblog 8 notes


Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Compelling. Mesmerizing. I&#8217;ve been hearing praises and I&#8217;ve noticed the hype about this book and because of my tendency to read what seems like awesome books much, much later, I kept myself on reins and didn&#8217;t read this immediately upon finding a copy of it. Boy did I regret my decision. I couldn&#8217;t believe I let myself not read this imaginative, beautiful story.
Daughter of Smoke and Bone is the story of the blue-haired, orphan Karou who draws monsters and strange creatures in her sketchbooks &#8212; beings who, contrary to what her friends believed, are real. A group of otherworldly people have raised her and from them, Karou gets her job of running errands and getting teeth &#8212; yes, teeth! &#8212; from collectors all over the world. Karou uses these portals that lead her to different parts of the world, from Paris to tropical countries. One day, a black handprint burned into the door of these portals started showing up and in one of her errands in Marrakesh, Karou gets attacked by the angel Akiva. From there, secrets start to unveil and Karou faces the reality of a war that she didn&#8217;t know she&#8217;s been a part of for a very long time.
Whoa. I don&#8217;t even know where to start. This is one of the books where my attempts at guessing the real deal came up futile. I was shocked and amazed to know the actual use for the teeth &#8212; which is one of the biggest mysteries as far as Karou is concerned. I was mesmerized with the star-crossed relationship that defined Karou and Akiva. I was shocked with Akiva&#8217;s secrets and even though I already had some inkling as to what it was, I kept myself in denial. I just felt a lot of emotions with this book. I was so engrossed.The characters were awesome. They&#8217;re interesting and dynamic and diverse. Some of them were spiteful, adorable, loving, frightening, unmoving, among others.Akiva and Karou&#8217;s relationship? It&#8217;s complicated and heartbreaking and difficult. But it&#8217;s also majestic and wonderful and inspiring. I&#8217;m hoping for the best in the upcoming books. Of course, hopeless romantic that I am, I&#8217;d want them to have their happily ever after because they&#8217;ve been denied of it.I would definitely read the next book. And I would recommend this to everybody who&#8217;s looking for a break from reality.

Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Compelling. Mesmerizing.

I’ve been hearing praises and I’ve noticed the hype about this book and because of my tendency to read what seems like awesome books much, much later, I kept myself on reins and didn’t read this immediately upon finding a copy of it.

Boy did I regret my decision. I couldn’t believe I let myself not read this imaginative, beautiful story.

Daughter of Smoke and Bone is the story of the blue-haired, orphan Karou who draws monsters and strange creatures in her sketchbooks — beings who, contrary to what her friends believed, are real. A group of otherworldly people have raised her and from them, Karou gets her job of running errands and getting teeth — yes, teeth! — from collectors all over the world. Karou uses these portals that lead her to different parts of the world, from Paris to tropical countries. One day, a black handprint burned into the door of these portals started showing up and in one of her errands in Marrakesh, Karou gets attacked by the angel Akiva. From there, secrets start to unveil and Karou faces the reality of a war that she didn’t know she’s been a part of for a very long time.



Whoa. I don’t even know where to start. This is one of the books where my attempts at guessing the real deal came up futile. I was shocked and amazed to know the actual use for the teeth — which is one of the biggest mysteries as far as Karou is concerned. I was mesmerized with the star-crossed relationship that defined Karou and Akiva. I was shocked with Akiva’s secrets and even though I already had some inkling as to what it was, I kept myself in denial. I just felt a lot of emotions with this book. I was so engrossed.

The characters were awesome. They’re interesting and dynamic and diverse. Some of them were spiteful, adorable, loving, frightening, unmoving, among others.

Akiva and Karou’s relationship? It’s complicated and heartbreaking and difficult. But it’s also majestic and wonderful and inspiring. I’m hoping for the best in the upcoming books. Of course, hopeless romantic that I am, I’d want them to have their happily ever after because they’ve been denied of it.

I would definitely read the next book. And I would recommend this to everybody who’s looking for a break from reality.



Posted 1 year ago reblog 8 notes


Legend by Marie Lu
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Bold. Kick-ass. Action-packed.There&#8217;s a lot to love about Legend. Once I started reading it, I couldn&#8217;t stop, didn&#8217;t even notice that I was almost to the end, and was sort of devastated that it ended. I wanted to read more about June and Day&#8217;s world. It&#8217;s just that engrossing and entertaining.
Legend follows the story of June Iparis and Daniel Altan &#8220;Day&#8221; Wing. Told in their alternating POVS, we get to see June&#8217;s life as the prodigy groomed to become a military figure in the Republic. She got perfect scores during the Trial and has incredible talents. Day is the Republic&#8217;s most wanted criminal, notorious for his anti-Republic stunts.Their paths crossed when Day infiltrated a hospital in search of the cure for his brother who has been stricken with the Plague. He got into a confrontation with June&#8217;s brother, Captain Metias and escaped after throwing a knife at Metias&#8217; shoulder. When Metias ended up dead - stabbed in the heart - and Day became the prime suspect, June went on a mission of capturing and exacting revenge on Day - the criminal no one has ever seen.
First of all, the characters. I love the characters in Legend. I love reading both of June and Day&#8217;s POVs. June is a prodigy. She&#8217;s honest. She felt real to me. Her disgust at first and her negative feelings about the slums was realistic. Day is simply amazing. A kick-ass hero that made me cheer for him and made me also giddy upon reading his mushy and soft moments.The antagonists in the book proved to be effective also. The Republic, as a whole, appeared to be so cold and deceptive.The action scenes. I love them! They&#8217;re quick-paced and exhilarating. You&#8217;ll see the characters jumping from buildings, traveling from roof to roof, street fighting and evading bullets. The scenes just felt so active and alive to me. There wasn&#8217;t any dull moment.The romance. Oh god. The romance between June and Day was just, gah. Ugh. Despite all the hellish trials and predicaments they were facing, it was so sweet and so inspiring to see them develop and form such a star-crossed relationship. To see them falling in love and getting conflicted about it was tragically beautiful.If there&#8217;s one thing that I didn&#8217;t quite like about the novel was the length. It felt too short for me. Oh, well. I guess that&#8217;s natural for a reader who really got into the characters world. I didn&#8217;t want to the story to end. Thank the heavens there&#8217;s a sequel. And the book having a sequel is justifiable because there are still a lot of questions to be answered, a lot of antagonistic asses to be kicked.I do really recommend reading Legend. And I&#8217;m looking forward to reading Prodigy.

Legend by Marie Lu

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Bold. Kick-ass. Action-packed.

There’s a lot to love about Legend. Once I started reading it, I couldn’t stop, didn’t even notice that I was almost to the end, and was sort of devastated that it ended. I wanted to read more about June and Day’s world. It’s just that engrossing and entertaining.

Legend follows the story of June Iparis and Daniel Altan “Day” Wing. Told in their alternating POVS, we get to see June’s life as the prodigy groomed to become a military figure in the Republic. She got perfect scores during the Trial and has incredible talents. Day is the Republic’s most wanted criminal, notorious for his anti-Republic stunts.

Their paths crossed when Day infiltrated a hospital in search of the cure for his brother who has been stricken with the Plague. He got into a confrontation with June’s brother, Captain Metias and escaped after throwing a knife at Metias’ shoulder. When Metias ended up dead - stabbed in the heart - and Day became the prime suspect, June went on a mission of capturing and exacting revenge on Day - the criminal no one has ever seen.



First of all, the characters. I love the characters in Legend. I love reading both of June and Day’s POVs. June is a prodigy. She’s honest. She felt real to me. Her disgust at first and her negative feelings about the slums was realistic. Day is simply amazing. A kick-ass hero that made me cheer for him and made me also giddy upon reading his mushy and soft moments.

The antagonists in the book proved to be effective also. The Republic, as a whole, appeared to be so cold and deceptive.

The action scenes. I love them! They’re quick-paced and exhilarating. You’ll see the characters jumping from buildings, traveling from roof to roof, street fighting and evading bullets. The scenes just felt so active and alive to me. There wasn’t any dull moment.

The romance. Oh god. The romance between June and Day was just, gah. Ugh. Despite all the hellish trials and predicaments they were facing, it was so sweet and so inspiring to see them develop and form such a star-crossed relationship. To see them falling in love and getting conflicted about it was tragically beautiful.

If there’s one thing that I didn’t quite like about the novel was the length. It felt too short for me. Oh, well. I guess that’s natural for a reader who really got into the characters world. I didn’t want to the story to end. Thank the heavens there’s a sequel. And the book having a sequel is justifiable because there are still a lot of questions to be answered, a lot of antagonistic asses to be kicked.

I do really recommend reading Legend. And I’m looking forward to reading Prodigy.




Posted 1 year ago reblog 2 notes


The Stillburrow Crush by Linda Kage
My rating: 5 of 5 stars


Since I&#8217;ve found this book on the fave list of someone, I&#8217;ve been looking forward to reading The Stillburrow Crush. I wasn&#8217;t disappointed because in the end, I totally loved this book. Of course, it&#8217;s not perfect but all the flaws in this book were covered up by all the wonderful points.
The Stillburrow Crush starts off with Carrie Paxton, the editor of the school paper, interviewing Lucas &#8220;Luke&#8221; Paxton, the quarterback, after a victorious football game. Carrie&#8217;s distinctively honest and straight-forward and at the beginning, she has this tendency to become rude whenever she speaks. When she talked to Luke, as he is such a lovable boy with your typical irresistible looks, she was drawn to him but ended up jumping into conclusions and insinuating things about Luke. The interview placed the both of them in heated grounds.
Then, to her bewilderment, Luke started to get close to her and she never thought that the town&#8217;s poster boy would be interested with her.
I love this book not just because of the fluff and the romance. There&#8217;s also pain and suffering in here that made my heart ache and made me cry.
So, they&#8217;re living in Stillburrow - a town that seemed stuck in a time capsule. All the old-world traditions and practices are still there like how people scorn the relationship between a privileged girl and a poor boy. It&#8217;s a small town where gossip always hang in the air.
Marty, Carrie&#8217;s older brother, was dating Abby Eggrow, the daughter of the school principal. Carrie was well aware of the fact that their relationship couldn&#8217;t end well. Abby was well-off while Marty was just the son of a mechanic. It wasn&#8217;t that Carrie was ashamed of their economic status. She&#8217;s very proud of her father&#8217;s work but she didn&#8217;t think that other people would see things the way she does. She knew that people would not approve of her brother&#8217;s relationship and that Abby would somehow leave her brother hanging alone. She didn&#8217;t want that for her brother because she could see that it was something serious for him and she didn&#8217;t want to see him hurt.
Carrie was right. Marty&#8217;s relationship with Abby ended in tragedy. I pitied him because of the pain that he went through. He loved so much and lost so much. It really moved me to read about a male character who&#8217;s so capable of being so in love. Marty&#8217;s words &#8212; his dreams for his and Abby&#8217;s future &#8212; were painfully sweet. Too bad it didn&#8217;t end well.
This kind of tragic love that was introduced in the book made me like the book more. It didn&#8217;t show love as just some kind of rainbow-unicorn-everything-is-good thing. It didn&#8217;t possess ignorance. It didn&#8217;t make us believe that everything pertaining to love would end up happily.
Now, regarding Carrie and Luke.
Both characters grew and turned into better ones as the story progressed. If at the beginning, Carrie was so ready to think the worst of Luke, she was able to learn to put a brake to her thoughts and actually see the good in him. I like Carrie for her strength and her honesty. Even though she somehow made things between her and Luke complicated, she was able to fix it along the way and open up her heart to Luke.
Luke was an absolute sweetheart. And one good thing about him was that he&#8217;s not perfect. He actually did some mistakes and I guess that made him real. He admitted that he was embarrassed at the thought of being interested with Carrie since she&#8217;s not a cheerleader but when he really got to know Carrie, he didn&#8217;t care anymore of those things. He liked Carrie. He loved her.
One thing that made the relationship real was their arguments. They fought but those arguments made them authentic. I sort of pitied Luke for having to deal with Carrie&#8217;s attacks at the beginning but was amused later on at his appreciation of Carrie&#8217;s sarcasm and remarks. And oh! The things he did to protect and defend her! :D
The reaction of Luke&#8217;s parents towards Carrie was also a good thing and a surprise. It actually proved some of Carrie&#8217;s thoughts wrong. The fact that they welcomed her proved that whatever status she had didn&#8217;t matter. She deserved Luke. Luke deserved her.
I total am placing this book in my fave list. :)

The Stillburrow Crush by Linda Kage

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Since I’ve found this book on the fave list of someone, I’ve been looking forward to reading The Stillburrow Crush. I wasn’t disappointed because in the end, I totally loved this book. Of course, it’s not perfect but all the flaws in this book were covered up by all the wonderful points.

The Stillburrow Crush starts off with Carrie Paxton, the editor of the school paper, interviewing Lucas “Luke” Paxton, the quarterback, after a victorious football game. Carrie’s distinctively honest and straight-forward and at the beginning, she has this tendency to become rude whenever she speaks. When she talked to Luke, as he is such a lovable boy with your typical irresistible looks, she was drawn to him but ended up jumping into conclusions and insinuating things about Luke. The interview placed the both of them in heated grounds.

Then, to her bewilderment, Luke started to get close to her and she never thought that the town’s poster boy would be interested with her.

I love this book not just because of the fluff and the romance. There’s also pain and suffering in here that made my heart ache and made me cry.

So, they’re living in Stillburrow - a town that seemed stuck in a time capsule. All the old-world traditions and practices are still there like how people scorn the relationship between a privileged girl and a poor boy. It’s a small town where gossip always hang in the air.

Marty, Carrie’s older brother, was dating Abby Eggrow, the daughter of the school principal. Carrie was well aware of the fact that their relationship couldn’t end well. Abby was well-off while Marty was just the son of a mechanic. It wasn’t that Carrie was ashamed of their economic status. She’s very proud of her father’s work but she didn’t think that other people would see things the way she does. She knew that people would not approve of her brother’s relationship and that Abby would somehow leave her brother hanging alone. She didn’t want that for her brother because she could see that it was something serious for him and she didn’t want to see him hurt.

Carrie was right. Marty’s relationship with Abby ended in tragedy. I pitied him because of the pain that he went through. He loved so much and lost so much. It really moved me to read about a male character who’s so capable of being so in love. Marty’s words — his dreams for his and Abby’s future — were painfully sweet. Too bad it didn’t end well.

This kind of tragic love that was introduced in the book made me like the book more. It didn’t show love as just some kind of rainbow-unicorn-everything-is-good thing. It didn’t possess ignorance. It didn’t make us believe that everything pertaining to love would end up happily.

Now, regarding Carrie and Luke.

Both characters grew and turned into better ones as the story progressed. If at the beginning, Carrie was so ready to think the worst of Luke, she was able to learn to put a brake to her thoughts and actually see the good in him. I like Carrie for her strength and her honesty. Even though she somehow made things between her and Luke complicated, she was able to fix it along the way and open up her heart to Luke.

Luke was an absolute sweetheart. And one good thing about him was that he’s not perfect. He actually did some mistakes and I guess that made him real. He admitted that he was embarrassed at the thought of being interested with Carrie since she’s not a cheerleader but when he really got to know Carrie, he didn’t care anymore of those things. He liked Carrie. He loved her.

One thing that made the relationship real was their arguments. They fought but those arguments made them authentic. I sort of pitied Luke for having to deal with Carrie’s attacks at the beginning but was amused later on at his appreciation of Carrie’s sarcasm and remarks. And oh! The things he did to protect and defend her! :D

The reaction of Luke’s parents towards Carrie was also a good thing and a surprise. It actually proved some of Carrie’s thoughts wrong. The fact that they welcomed her proved that whatever status she had didn’t matter. She deserved Luke. Luke deserved her.

I total am placing this book in my fave list. :)



Posted 2 years ago


Forgive my Fins (Fins #1) by Tera Lynn Childs
My rating: 4 of 5 stars


Lily Sanderson has had a crush on Brody Bennett ever since she went to Seaview High. It had been her plan to reveal her feelings for him and tell him who she really was. But, her identity wasn&#8217;t a simple matter for Lily&#8217;s actually a half-human, half-mermaid princess of the underwater kingdom of Thalassinia. Her plan: confess to Brody and be mated with him for the rest of her life. She felt that everything would be okay and they&#8217;d live happily and that they belong together since Brody, a swimmer, appreciates the beauty of water. Then came her neighbor Quince Fletcher and things she never thought in her wildest dreams happened.
*
So, after reading Oh. My. Gods. by Tera Lynn Childs, I kind of warmed up to her. When I found an ebook of this story, I was immediately enticed because I like mermaid stories and when I realized that it&#8217;s written by Childs, I immediately read it.
I liked it and I enjoyed reading Forgive my Fins because it was entertaining and I found lovable characters. To add, the plot and the turn of events reeled me in and kept me engrossed in the story.
The unexpected moment that caused Quince, the annoying neighbor, to be a key player in Lily&#8217;s life made me happy. I always knew that she&#8217;d end up with Quince because I didn&#8217;t see what was so amazing with Brody. And I hated the name Brody and wouldn&#8217;t like to think of him ending up with Lily. Quince, on the other hand, has such an intriguing personality (a beautiful name!) and he&#8217;s not boring.
Lily at times irritated me. Like a lot of heroines out there, she&#8217;s so delusional and everything that Quince had said about her not being able to see beyond the surface of people was definitely true. There are times when she&#8217;s shallow. At the beginning, she couldn&#8217;t understand and realize what the deal really was. Despite Quince&#8217;s attempts of making her understand some things, she&#8217;s just so close-minded.
And her incapability to truly know her feelings! God, was it annoying. It frustrated me to read about her insisting that whatever feelings she was having for Quince was just a result of the bond, nothing more.
I&#8217;m just really happy when she was able to overcome that flaw of hers. It would have been a bummer if she didn&#8217;t realize that she didn&#8217;t really love Brody. It was also good when she finally came up with a decision in the end.
Swoon. Quince Fletcher! I am in love with him. I&#8217;m such a sucker for boys who get their hearts broken. It was obvious that he had feelings for Lily and you kind of had to sympathize with the guy after all that he went through because of Lily. I mean, he was constantly being judged and rejected.
One of my favorite scenes was when they were in the island for three days &#8212; when Quince admitted about knowing what love is, discerning reality from fantasy.
Overall, I was satisfied with how the book progressed. Childs was able to deliver characters that would make you continue reading.

Forgive my Fins (Fins #1) by Tera Lynn Childs

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Lily Sanderson has had a crush on Brody Bennett ever since she went to Seaview High. It had been her plan to reveal her feelings for him and tell him who she really was. But, her identity wasn’t a simple matter for Lily’s actually a half-human, half-mermaid princess of the underwater kingdom of Thalassinia. Her plan: confess to Brody and be mated with him for the rest of her life. She felt that everything would be okay and they’d live happily and that they belong together since Brody, a swimmer, appreciates the beauty of water. Then came her neighbor Quince Fletcher and things she never thought in her wildest dreams happened.

*

So, after reading Oh. My. Gods. by Tera Lynn Childs, I kind of warmed up to her. When I found an ebook of this story, I was immediately enticed because I like mermaid stories and when I realized that it’s written by Childs, I immediately read it.

I liked it and I enjoyed reading Forgive my Fins because it was entertaining and I found lovable characters. To add, the plot and the turn of events reeled me in and kept me engrossed in the story.

The unexpected moment that caused Quince, the annoying neighbor, to be a key player in Lily’s life made me happy. I always knew that she’d end up with Quince because I didn’t see what was so amazing with Brody. And I hated the name Brody and wouldn’t like to think of him ending up with Lily. Quince, on the other hand, has such an intriguing personality (a beautiful name!) and he’s not boring.

Lily at times irritated me. Like a lot of heroines out there, she’s so delusional and everything that Quince had said about her not being able to see beyond the surface of people was definitely true. There are times when she’s shallow. At the beginning, she couldn’t understand and realize what the deal really was. Despite Quince’s attempts of making her understand some things, she’s just so close-minded.

And her incapability to truly know her feelings! God, was it annoying. It frustrated me to read about her insisting that whatever feelings she was having for Quince was just a result of the bond, nothing more.

I’m just really happy when she was able to overcome that flaw of hers. It would have been a bummer if she didn’t realize that she didn’t really love Brody. It was also good when she finally came up with a decision in the end.

Swoon. Quince Fletcher! I am in love with him. I’m such a sucker for boys who get their hearts broken. It was obvious that he had feelings for Lily and you kind of had to sympathize with the guy after all that he went through because of Lily. I mean, he was constantly being judged and rejected.

One of my favorite scenes was when they were in the island for three days — when Quince admitted about knowing what love is, discerning reality from fantasy.

Overall, I was satisfied with how the book progressed. Childs was able to deliver characters that would make you continue reading.



Posted 2 years ago reblog 4 notes

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Jedaia Rose has read 39 books toward her goal of 200 books.
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